Greetings

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Greetings

Postby Splunge » October 17th, 2016, 11:04 pm

Hello Origami community,

I've been lurking around for several months now, so it's about time to introduce myself. My name is Bernd, 41 years old from Germany, father of two children.

My interest into Origami started in my youth, when I discovered a book from Robert Harbin on my parents book shelf. Later on, other books followed, but at that time I still considered Harbin's book to contain the most interesting models for me.

As I became older, leaving school, I focused on other hobbies and interests. Probably also, because I didn't see any advance or new challenges in my Origami skills.

It was many years later, actually just about two to three years ago, when I digged up the old books again and checked the internet for additional literature. That's when I came across Robert J. Lang's Origami Design Secrets among others. A must have, I knew immediately.
A completely new approach and level of understanding opened up to me. It seemed, as if the world of Origami has turned very fast in the last 20-30 years. But in fact, it already developed drastically several decades before my birth with the work of Akira Yoshizawa. I simply wasn't aware due to the lack of international communities like this forum at that time.

Discovering models like Ryujin or the lich king made my eyes pop and created the wish to build those for myself. As a child I had to learn, that some wishes will never be granted. Let's see if this is still true...
While I have no problem to follow the diagrams of many complex models, the biggest challenge for me at the moment is the accuracy and the final shaping of the model.

I did finish Nguyen Hung Cuong's Eagle, for example, but it more looked like a capercaillie cock than an eagle :o). One reason could be that I folded it with Biotope paper. Probably not the best choice. But I'm still learning and getting better at it, I think...
What I learned was, that you should not expect to get a complexe model perfect on the first try.

As soon as I have improved my skills, the next big step will be to understand and collapse crease patterns. This is still a mystery to me. Whether I will ever be able to realize my own ideas and create new models, I don't know.

Another topic that opened up to me was the choice of paper. Or to be more precise the variety of paper. In my early days, I only used copy paper and maybe some Kami. For those medium level models, it was sufficient, though not very beautiful.
Thanks to globalization, today one can get nearly any type of paper from around the world. When I came across Nicolas Terry's shop I felt like a child in a toy store. Papers like Biotope, thin Kraft or Nicolas Terry's Tissue Foil offer so much more folding pleasure and possibilities.

I tried various papers, but in the end I came back to paper, that I could have used already in my youth. I just never got the idea to use it for folding Origami. I'm talking about tissue paper and mulberry paper (called "Faserseide" in Germany). I can get these papers from the local handicraft workshop in various colors. The key is to treat the paper with MC. It took me a while to understand, that "MC" stands for methyl cellulose, the main component of tapestry glue. Again something you can get at the next hardware store. Mulberry paper is really beautiful and thin but strong. And the big advantage of it and especially of the even thinner tissue paper is, that you can create color-changing paper as required for your model. You just have to make sure to use non-bleeding tissue paper.

But back to what Origami means to me. For a start, it's a hobby beside others, like paper-crafting, scale model building (mostly 1/12 multi-media car kits) or photography, depending on the mood and occasion.
Origami puts me into a relaxing mood, though sometimes it's quiet despairing to understand a complex folding step. Especially if after several attempts, the paper becomes soft or starts to tear. Something you can only fight with experience and patience, I guess.

I mainly fold models from square paper, no cuts, no glue, except for shaping with MC. Normally I don't paint my models afterwards. But maybe I will use it one day to highlight details, like adding shadows etc.
My preferred models are complex ones, for the challenge. Though I'm also interested into more simple ones, which have a different, more abstract kind of expression. Take the works of Giang Dinh as the other extreme.

Why I came to this forum? Well, I'm looking for an exchange of ideas and inspiration. I've already seen so many fantastic models from users of this forum. The level of detail, accuracy and simply style is just impressive.
At the moment there is not much I can offer in exchange. But my aim is to at least present some of my models to the community later on and support new Origami followers.

I hope my introduction was not too excessive.

Regards
Bernd
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Re: Greetings

Postby origami_8 » October 19th, 2016, 10:00 am

Hello Bernd,

welcome on board. Image
It would be great to see some photos of the things you fold. The best way to post pictures is via a Flickr account, but you can also upload them elsewhere if you prefer.
Have you been to an Origami convention yet?
Depending on where in Germany you live the might also be a regional group in your area.
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Re: Greetings

Postby Splunge » October 19th, 2016, 9:04 pm

Hello Anna,

Thank you for the warm welcome.
I'm currently working on a complete redesign of my website. I've just chosen the photo gallery CMS (Koken) and now I'm uploading the content. I will make sure, that it will also contain pictures of my few noteworthy folds (more to come over time). As soon as the web page goes live, I will post a link in the galleries section of this forum.

So far, I've not attended any Origami convetions. But I will keep my eyes open for upcoming events and local Origami groups.

BTW: I'm also taking part in the IOIO 2016. First test folds are done. Now I'm preparing the paper. Though I fear, that I will not be able to finish all models :(
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Re: Greetings

Postby origami_8 » October 21st, 2016, 10:34 pm

Taking part is all that counts. There's no use in stressing yourself. Just do what is fun for you, concentrate on doing those tasks good instead of rushing through all the models.
I don't know about you but I don't participate to win but because I enjoy folding. Chances to win are slim anyway.

Attending Origami conventions is a good way to widen your horizon. You can meet a lot of other Origami enthusiasts at one place, exchange ideas, learn new things and most often also buy Origami supplies like books and paper.
There is a very good convention from December 8 to 11 in Italy. Should you have the time and money, I would recommend you to go there. The Italian Conventions are awesome.
http://www.origami-cdo.it/cdo/convegno/indexen.html

To understand and collapse Crease Patterns, it is best to start the other way round. Fold a model, colour the different parts in different colours and unfold the model to see what part went where. You will soon recognize patters. Most Crease Patterns consist of the same few elements and having folded the part before, you will already know ho to get there.
For the most part there are two different kinds of Crease Patterns, the ones with folding sequences and box pleated ones. Box Pleating is both easier and more complicated. Easier because you just fold a grid, make some diagonals, collapse into a base and shape. More complicated because some bases might prove almost impossible to collapse, the bases can get very thick and shaping takes as much time as the two steps before did.
Origami Design Secrets is a wonderful book that describes everything in detail, but to really understand Crease Patterns you need practice.
If you want to try your hands at some easy CPs I can recommend you Yoshimasa Tsuruta's Cow.
CP: https://www.flickr.com/photos/128711470 ... 456802753/
Picture: https://www.flickr.com/photos/128711470 ... otostream/
For Boxpleating there is Gerwin Sturm's (unfortunately unfinished) Boxpleating Guide, where on part II, Page 6 there is a simple Crease Pattern that you can try to form into a boy or into a stem with three leaves for a Rose.
http://www.origamiaustria.at/articles.php?lang=2#a4

Ryujin is not as far away as you might think.
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Re: Greetings

Postby Splunge » October 24th, 2016, 12:10 pm

Thanks again for the many advices, tips and recommendations. :)

Just a small update: I finally released the update of my web page (see signature).
The Origami specific gallery is still quite empty. New models will be added from time to time.
splunge.de - Origami, Papercraft, Scale models, Photography
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