Sara's Video thread: wish a model

General discussion about Origami, Papers, Diagramming, ...

Postby Sara » June 8th, 2009, 6:00 am

So yesterday I ordered ... lots of stuff. It seems 9 origami books and some paper. Amongst those books are the OrigamiUSA Collection 2007 and License to Fold. I got a preview of the diagrams for the dreaming dog, and just gave it a try. Here's the mediocre result (15cm kami, obviously dry-folded):

Image

Next time round I'll have to make the head bigger, and the body thinner, I think. Plus, shaping the legs is tricky. And altogether I just have to try to figure out how to make this model look just slightly more like the beautiful result we saw on the pictures posted here previously. :roll:

-- Sara
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Postby HankSimon » June 8th, 2009, 10:21 am

Great start using dry folding.

Both Nicolas Terry and Eric Joisel have said that the first few attempts at folding Dinh's paper sculptures "will be, er ...disappointing..." because the models are Very complex. All of the folds are very soft and rounded at different degrees, rather than uniformly sharp and creased, like traditional origami.

I've used paper towels, construction paper, and watercolor paper (Dinh uses watercolor paper)... and I've had increasing, tho inadequate, success...
Plus I used my dog as a model :-)

Be persistent and try to take notes for each attempt, because every change in proportion and every increase in the sharpness of a crease results in a different effect in softness of the final model.

I am confident that your first attempt using wetfolding will show much progress.

- Hank Simon
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Postby Sara » June 9th, 2009, 10:19 am

Second attempt. Looks a bit too alert to be sleeping. ;)
I made the body a bit thinner, and the head a bit bigger. I'm not happy with the nose, but think both the ears (less fox-like) and the front legs turned out better this time round. The tail also still reminds me too much of a fox. I'll keep experimenting.
[Paper: 15cm square, slightly wet-folded]
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Postby legionzilla » June 9th, 2009, 11:52 am

This is better, though you could improve on th 3d effect.
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Postby HankSimon » June 9th, 2009, 11:55 pm

So this one is "Waking Dog" :-D

1. To remove the "Fox Tail" effect, you might try making the tail concave down, rather than flat or concave up.

2. For Body Shaping hints, look at the Shape! photos from Sleeping Cat.
(Step 11a in Sleeping Dog)

3. Step 6 for the Nose isn't very clear. I think it may be more of a 3D Swallowtail crimp (?). And not clear how to thin the nose by folding it under as indicated in Step 11a. (There's a lot of detail loaded in that single step)

Looking forward to the next attempt.

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Postby chesslo » June 11th, 2009, 7:01 am

Not bad first trys, keep up the good work! :D
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Postby Sara » June 28th, 2009, 11:48 am

My newest video is out. It's on Fujimoto-san's tessellation "Clover Folding":

http://www.happyfolding.com/instruction ... er_folding

Enjoy,

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Postby legionzilla » June 28th, 2009, 1:57 pm

I like the magic marker!!!
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Postby penselen » July 7th, 2009, 7:30 am

Hi Sara, I think a lot of folks would love to fold an easy color changed rose:
ImageImage
It is diagrammed in Harbin's Origami Four and designed by Martin Wall of GB. circa 1973. It's easy to fold, just an in/out sink of a bird base, but the shaping is what makes it come alive. I think the book is not so easy for most people to come by, but I'm sure the BOS has it. BTW, you are very kind to do these videos for the ori-community. Thanks!
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Postby JVega » July 7th, 2009, 12:51 pm

And what I wish something which is not a model? :roll:
"Keep On Folding!!"

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Postby Sara » July 7th, 2009, 1:22 pm

penselen wrote:It is diagrammed in Harbin's Origami Four

I fear I only have Harbin 1-3, and I do not live in England anymore.

JVega wrote:And what I wish something which is not a model?


Hm, that suggests
    * a video on techniques
    * a video where I just talk randomly about stuff
    * something else altogether?

You might be lucky, because my plan for this month is to show some techniques again. Presumably I'll show some of the following:
    * grids (square, triangle)
    * pleat intersections (120°, inverted 120°, 90°, 60°, rabbit ear triangle sink)
    * twists (triangle, square, hexagon, rhombus, open-back versions)
Have you discovered the theme yet?

-- Sara
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Sara's Video thread: wish a model

Postby gordigami » July 7th, 2009, 11:10 pm

Hmmmm...
Kinda looks, Sara, like you might be embarking on a tesselation exploration ! Certainly an intriguing adjunct to representational origami.
I look forward to following your quest.
As a side note, personally, I am hoping that you might, sometime down the road, follow this series with a sorely needed exploration of crease pattern interpretation.
There have, of course, been several instructions graciously made available, but I feel that there is further need of clear, interesting, instruction , hopefully with a smidgon of informal insight to counterbalance the inevitable pedantic presentation .
If you, or certainly, anyone were to take on this challenge, I would have to think that it would be immensely appreciated !
As always, many thanks for your considerable contributions.
May I wish success to all who cope with the mountains & valleys of Life,
with all its peaks & depths, as well as Origami .
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Postby legionzilla » July 8th, 2009, 3:03 am

Why don't you diagram the Terrasica Palm?
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Postby Sara » July 8th, 2009, 6:27 am

gordigami wrote:As a side note, personally, I am hoping that you might, sometime down the road, follow this series with a sorely needed exploration of crease pattern interpretation.


The problem with that is: I haven't folded much from crease patterns yet, and just don't know enough about it (yet?).

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Sara's video thread : Wish a model .

Postby gordigami » July 8th, 2009, 9:05 am

Sara said :
The problem with that is: I haven't folded much from crease patterns yet, and just don't know enough about it (yet?).


Thanks for honest response. I'm in the same boat... I appreciate the crease pattern links from the forum, but feel elaboration would be helpful.
Maybe someone would like to do a book, " Crease patterns for Dummies " ?
Or..
" Diagramming for Dummies ! " ( cough.. Nicolas Terry.. cough...)
Thanks !
May I wish success to all who cope with the mountains & valleys of Life,
with all its peaks & depths, as well as Origami .
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