MC substitutes: starches, gelatine, PVA, etc.

General discussion area for learning about paper, and the different types available.
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Origami_Hunt
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Egg wihite powder + PVA. Recommended.

Post by Origami_Hunt »

Recipe and how to use it:

The same as the egg white powder one (the previous post) but add a bit of PVA.

It produces double-tissue with the consistency of methylcellulose double tissue. Perhaps a bit crispier, but without the plastic feeling that MC produces.

NOTE: PVA can be used on its own, but it produces a plasticky paper that wants to unfold and that is difficult to shape. The addition of egg-white powder cures the problem.
Recommended.

Where can I find egg white powder?

Usually in the backing section of the supermarket. British Tesco sells four sachets of 5 grams per £1.2. One sachet allows you to produce a 45 cm x 75 cm double tissue paper.
Image
Use sachets to give this a try. However, I would buy it in bulk, to get it cheaper. Amazon sells bags of 500 grams (enough for 100 sheets) for £13 (MC costs about £22 per 500 grams).

Index of sizing agents
Last edited by Origami_Hunt on October 18th, 2020, 10:13 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Mashed potato powder from the supermarket

Post by Origami_Hunt »

It produces a crisp double-tissue paper that is a pleasure to fold. However, it tends to split. It is also quite sensitive to ambient humidity. I believe the sugar content is the reason for its sensitivity, although it may be that the stach itself attracts water. A bit a PVA cures the problem.

Where can you buy it?

In supermarkets.
Image

Recipe and how to use it.

Add a tablespoon of the power to an 8th of one paint (enough to produce 1 sheet of double-tissue paper).
Warm it up until you produce "mashed potato".
Do not eat it, just let it cool down.
Use it as methylcellulose.

Index of sizing agents
Last edited by Origami_Hunt on September 28th, 2020, 10:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Tankoda
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Re: MC substitutes: starches, gelatine, PVA, etc.

Post by Tankoda »

Hahaha you're breaking new ground here! Thanks for doing this, i need to explore these
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Origami_Hunt
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Agar-Agar

Post by Origami_Hunt »

It does not work well, but I thought it would. Agar-agar is a long carbohydrate; it belongs to the same chemical family as other starches and as methylcelulose. There are two problems using this:

You have to warm it up to dissolve it. This is not a problem, but then
1- It will form a gel with little material. Half a tablespoon in a pint will probably gel, so if you use this, you will add little sizing to the paper.
2- The paper warps as it dries.

The good side is that you can use it in cooking to produce nice desserts.

Index of sizing agents
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Potato flour - recommended

Post by Origami_Hunt »

Potato flour (not potato mash flakes) produces very good double-tissue paper. It is far far less sensitive to ambient humidity than potato mush flakes, so much so, that you do not need to add a bit to PVA (necessary for potato mash flakes). Recommended.

Where to buy it

I found it in an Asian mini-market. It costs £2-3 per kilogram. You need about 5 grams to make a typical 75 x 50 cm double-tissue sheet. You can buy it from Amazon; t costs around £3-4 per kilo (less than two pence per sheet), ten times cheaper than MC, that costs about £44-60 per kilogram.

How to use it

1- Mix 5 grams of flour (a tablespoon, not heaped) in a quarter of paint of water. The amount depends on your needs.
2- Boil it until it becomes a clear gel (potato mash flakes makes a whitish paste).
3- Let it cool down a bit.
4- Add a bit of cold water and whisk it to break the gel. This is important. It removes lumps and makes easier spreading the gel.
5- Paint the glass with it before the gel sets again. This helps in keeping the tissue paper straight.
6- Lay a sheet of tissue paper.
7- Allow the gel permeate the sheet.
8- Lay another sheet on top of the first one.
9- Paint it with the gel.

List of sizing agents
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Origami_Hunt
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How to use sizing agents

Post by Origami_Hunt »

Method 1: Recommended for sizing agents that are fairly liquid such as methylcellulose, PVA, and egg-while powder. Gelatine is included if you use it before it forms a gel.

1- Lay two sheets on top of the glass one on top of the other.
2- Paint the top sheet with the liquid. The liquid with the sizing agent will permeate both sheets, so it is not necessary to paint sheets individually.

Method 2: Recommended for sizing agents that are gels or pastes that are not too thick. Most starches.

1- Paint the glass. This will size from the bottom and it will help faster the sheets.
2- Lay two sheets on the glass, one on top on the other.
3- Paint the top sheet. The sizing agent will permeate both sheets from the top.

Method 3. Recommended for pastes or gels that are thick and do not permeate easily the sheets or for papers that do not allow water to permeate (non-bleeding paper).

1- Paint the glass. This will size from the bottom sheet and it will help fasten the sheets.
2- Lay one sheet on the glass.
3- Paint it.
4- Lay the second sheet on top of the first one.
5- Paint it.

Method 3 will add three times more sizing agent than method 1. Method 3 is good for models that require some bulkiness such as mammals, while method 1 is better for models that require several layers to overlap.
Last edited by Origami_Hunt on November 6th, 2020, 9:53 pm, edited 5 times in total.
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Which paper can be used?

Post by Origami_Hunt »

It works well with bleeding tissue. Often it is not necessary to paint every sheet because the sizing agents can permeate the paper.

Non-bleeding tissue paper. The non-bleeding treatment may make the paper a bit water-proof. It is often necessary to paint the glass and every sheet of paper.

Non-stick baking paper. This paper is coated to prevent food to stick to the paper, so it does not take sizing agents (or water) well.
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