Crease Pattern FAQ

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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby phillipcurl » November 19th, 2012, 2:37 pm

not necessarily, a lot of them are 22.5 or other angle based, and even some hex pleated ones.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby JSiph » February 5th, 2013, 8:48 pm

Does anyone know of any other websites with simple-intermediate crease patterns because the links seem to be broken for me? I'm just getting into crease patterns.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby origamipete » May 26th, 2013, 8:45 pm

JSiph wrote:Does anyone know of any other websites with simple-intermediate crease patterns because the links seem to be broken for me? I'm just getting into crease patterns.


Sorry for not giving any concrete suggestion, but I decided to answer your question in a more general way.

You can give a try to any CP that doesn't have "too many lines" from your point of view and start from there.

What is "simple enough" differs based on your previous origami experience in general. If you have folded a lot of models that are rated as "complex" form diagrams, I think you are ready. Folding from diagrams, especially complex ones, is essential for being able to collapse crease patterns. It provides you with experience, where you can learn what paper looks like after you fold it along certain lines. There are often sturctures that repeat themselves like building blocks of many different crease patterns, and if you are able to recognize these structures, it's gonna make your life a whole lot easier - for example, many crease patterns involve a traditional base with some added features around it, these might be the best ones to start with, actually.
If you have folded a lot of models that are rated as "complex" form diagrams, and are confident, I think you are ready to even try something by Miyajima Noboru, Jason Ku or other well-known origamists. Even though many of them have a large number of complex designs, you can always find a few models that even a beginner CP folder could do. :wink:

Also, a really good place for crease patterns is flickr, where many people (including myslelf) post their designs and CPs. Flickr has a surprisingly large origami community, I think you'll find many good level CPs there.

I wish you good luck and if you needed help with any CP, feel free to contact me, here or one flickr ("origamiPete") and can see what I can do to help. :twisted:
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby l0lm4tt » June 18th, 2013, 11:16 am

I am definitely making jason ku's 3 headed dragon. just needs a 44x44 grid
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby Kicker » July 26th, 2013, 8:07 pm

Do you know where I can find tutorials on how to design crease patterns ?
I'd love to create my own models but so far, the only thing I have found on technical folding is this :
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8uIJBdX36o
But there are a lot of things I don't understand in this video...
Like how does he choose where to put the circles ?
How does he decide if the head/tail will be in a corner, or in the middle of an edge ?
What if I want to make branches on my origami ? (like on a tree).
How does he decide the size of the grid ?
etc.

Thanks in advance :)
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby origamipete » July 28th, 2013, 9:23 am

Like how does he choose where to put the circles ? - If you wait 'till the beginning of august, I'll record my own "designer's guide to crease patterns" and I will adress this (and many more) there.

How does he decide if the head/tail will be in a corner, or in the middle of an edge ? - taste. very arbitrary, right? it really doesn't matter whether you use "diagonal symmetry" or "book symmetry", but sometimes diagonal symmetry can produce a more efficient design. It works best for long-tailed and/or long-necked animals - you don't find many origami giraffes that use book symmetry. In contrast, frogs are born to almost exclusively use book symmetry, but most of the time, it doesn't matter. =)

branches? you want to make an origami tree? because there are two kinds of origami trees. stick figures and actual models of trees. which one do you mean?

size of the grid? - depends on the number of flaps in your design and their length. the higher the number and the longer the flaps, the larger grid you'll need.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby Kicker » July 28th, 2013, 5:11 pm

Thanks ! That answers a lot of things.
I'll be waiting for your video :)
By "tree", I mean that pretty much all origami models I saw have flaps, and that's it.
But what if I want to make flaps which bear flaps which themselves bear more flaps ?
Like instead of something like this :
Image
I want something like this :
Image
Like some sort of origami fractals :)
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby origamipete » July 29th, 2013, 12:41 pm

All right, so you're looking for a flapception? XD I'll use the second tree in the tutorial. ;)

I'll give you the link to the video when it's done.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby Kicker » July 29th, 2013, 8:53 pm

Yes, that's exactly what I'm talking about ^^ (Yo dawg ! I herd you liked flaps...)
The thing is that I want to design a wyvern with an oddly shaped tail that requires that kind of fantasies :)
Meanwhile, I have the works of Satoshi Kamiya to discover (I've been folding for almost 25 years and I didn't even know this guys ! :shock: )
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby Mir Numaan » October 14th, 2013, 2:26 am

then you have not done the real origami :P
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby Mir Numaan » November 16th, 2013, 4:57 pm

from what side is it easy to collapse a cp? colored side or white side??
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby phillipcurl » November 17th, 2013, 12:48 am

mir numaan: it isn't easier from either side. I usually fold CPs from one colored paper, but if it is box pleated and you folded from a dual colored paper for some reason, make the edges mountain folds on the side you want the color to be and collapse inward.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby OrigamiGeek » November 22nd, 2013, 7:38 pm

quick question:
when you are measuring reference on a paper where should you measure from?
example: should you measure from the corner to the point or from the edge to the point and should you measure from two points?
I hope my question makes scene
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby phillipcurl » November 22nd, 2013, 10:30 pm

It depends, really.
If you are trying to get x/y coordinates (to use in reference finder), measure on the horizontal edge to the point, then on the vertical edge to the point.
Otherwise, you can take measurements of any straight line on the paper and plug that into a proportion to solve for X...
Here is an example:
Code: Select all
Setting up the proportion:
1         x
--   =   --
10       15

Solving for X:
10x    15
--  =  --
10     10

Answer:
x = 1.5


You can use that method on any straight line in the CP. Diagonals, horizontals, etc. Same as used for finding a point in RF, which seems to be a widely misunderstood but rarely talked about problem.
To find the X/Y coordinates of a point on a square plane, you need to measure to the line the point is located on.
Code: Select all
Say the point is located here:
  _ _ _
|     . | 
|_ _ _|   

You would measure to that line.
  _ _ _
|     | |
|_ _|_|

After you have done that, repeat the same on the adjacent side. In this example, we have 2/3 and 2/3 as our measurements. Plug that into reference finder, in the respective input boxes, and it will give you the diagrams for how to reach that point; which in this case is a division of thirds.

Hope that answered your question, didn't really understand what you were asking.
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Re: Crease Pattern FAQ

Postby OrigamiGeek » November 23rd, 2013, 12:42 am

thank you in the second sentence you answered the question :)
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