Level shifters

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Re: Level shifters

Postby Tankoda » August 18th, 2018, 3:33 am

Thanks! I've actually figured it out since then, but I may look at the videos anyway.
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Baltorigamist » August 18th, 2018, 9:29 pm

I can't remember if it's covered in ODS, but there's actually some pretty simple math that will let you get a workable level shifter just about every time:
Take the angle formed by the corner where the shifter is located; then the angle of the shifter itself will always be exactly half of that, i.e. equal to the measure of the angle bisector. The creases will be moved to one side, but the relative angle will be the same.
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Tankoda » August 24th, 2018, 11:30 pm

Not exactly sure what you mean, Baltorigamist… But yes it is covered in ODS.
Do you mean the shape that you get when you spread squash a corner flap in a box pleated model for example?
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Andre-4 » August 1st, 2019, 1:16 pm

Tankoda wrote:Not exactly sure what you mean, Baltorigamist… But yes it is covered in ODS.
Do you mean the shape that you get when you spread squash a corner flap in a box pleated model for example?

Almost..but i use them not for flattening a sharp sink or protruding corner...its for when you want to change the direction of the paper neatly..either to make hair or apron on a human model or colour change ..then you are left with a fan shape the diamonds allow the ease and tucks unwanted paper away
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Merlyngami » August 1st, 2019, 9:04 pm

Single-level level shifters are relatively simple, but when you're wanting to shift up more than one level they can get pretty complicated, eg Lang's wasp.
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Baltorigamist » August 1st, 2019, 11:16 pm

Assuming you mean his yellow jacket, I think that level shifter is more complicated than it needs to be (though I’m going from memory here).
What I like about level shifters is that there’s basically no limit to how they can be done except the designer’s creativity. I’ve done one, for example, that connects an ax+3 pleat to two smaller ones—namely ax+2 and ax+1. I’ll post a pic if I can get one.

I think this thread is overdue for tips on how to create level shifters for various situations. If anyone has some, feel free to share; I’ll submit my own later this week.
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Re: Level shifters

Postby NeverCeaseToCrease » August 1st, 2019, 11:36 pm

Basically, the more pleats you have, the higher levels you can shift to. You can get to axial+3 with one pleat, axial+6 with 2 pleats, etc, but that's only if you stay along the grid and 45 degree ridge creases. If you are willing to "get off the grid" like in lang's wasp, you can shift to axial+4 pretty easily, and it's possible to go higher with just one pleat but it gets messy.

If you don't know what I mean, I can post some crease pattern examples. I've found level shifters handy for creating various styles of clothing for box pleated human figures.
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Re: Level shifters

Postby Merlyngami » August 2nd, 2019, 5:23 am

Yeah level shifters are very useful, and I guess the reason the ones in langs yellow jacket are so complex is because hes trying to maximise the are of the wider part, so the abdomen is the correct shape. It's impressive how much you can do with box pleating if you start to incorporate creases that aren't at a multiple of 45°, like in Kota Imai's insect models. Probably the most impressive box pleating layer management however is in Shuki Katos tilted grid models, like his elephant or gigantosaurus. I dont even understand how he goes about designing those.

I think I know the type of level shifter you mean NeverCeaseToCrease, is it similar in structure to the basic axial + 2 ones but with more pleats on the 'skinny' half?
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