Mulberry Paper

General discussion about Origami, Papers, Diagramming, ...

Postby mastermattdude » September 2nd, 2005, 2:00 am

Does anybody think that it would work to try to use some thinned out glue to thicken tissue paper? That would be cool because tissue paper is easier to get that mulberry paper (for me at least) . Also, how much water would i add to the glue to thin it out ( ex. 25%....)?
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Postby TheRealChris » September 2nd, 2005, 2:15 am

mastermattdude wrote:Does anybody think that it would work to try to use some thinned out glue to thicken tissue paper? That would be cool because tissue paper is easier to get that mulberry paper (for me at least) . Also, how much water would i add to the glue to thin it out ( ex. 25%....)?


I wouldn't advice to thin out the glue, because it could become impossible to glue the tissue paper onto the wet foil (too much water!). the tissue paper would tear (or better to be said "flow away") in the moment, it touches the foil. well, you could lay it onto the foil, but another contact is not recommendable, and the result will be a heavily crumpled sheet of paper.
but it's really possible to make a thicker tissue foil, by using more glue. I've done that a couple of times.


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Postby origamimasterjared » September 2nd, 2005, 6:21 am

Chris, he's not talking about tissue-foil. He wants to make regular tissue paper thicker. Painting the tissue paper completely with glue will make the paper much crisper and easier to fold. I know Manuel Sirgo does exactly that. Yes, you'll want to thin the glue a little; otherwise it would tear the paper when you try to spread it out...
And I heard a while back that Satoshi Kamiya also sometimes uses white glue for his models, In the same way that LaFosse and Lang et. al. use methyl-cellulose.
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Postby mastermattdude » September 2nd, 2005, 1:14 pm

Ok thanks both of you I think later today I might try to use glue to thicken out the tissue paper.
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Postby malachi » September 2nd, 2005, 9:17 pm

I don't think I've seen this mentioned here before. Apparently, not to be outdone by Target, Wal-Mart is now stocking Thai mulberry paper in 10 sheet packs of 12 inch squares (as well as an assortment pack of irregular shapes and sizes). They had a packs of "Bright" as well as "Pastel", each came with 5 different colors, so I assume two sheets of each color. I didn't pick any up, but I think it is a good sign. It cost a little bit less than $4 here, and was part of a larger display of different types of paper for scrapbooking in the craft section.
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Postby T » September 2nd, 2005, 10:42 pm

in response to mastermattdude I tried this method of creating a paper.

I firstly got one sheet of tissue paper (dark red) and covered in PVA glue (about 60 % water 40% glue ) with a paint brush. Then I added on another layer of black tissue paper ( if you roll it out well you dont get crumples). Then I coated the outside of the paper in the same PVA glue mix.

It creates a nice paper that can hold a fold and is easy to collapse. (It's suprisingly similar to tissue foil except for the sculpting. It also gives the model a sort of shiny look which works well for dark colours with insects.

At the end of the model a good thing I tried was wet folding the model except instead of using just water I used a PVA 40% water 60%. This works just like wet folding except the model dries harder. I also find it's easier to sculpt with the glue mixture and it creates a nice shine.

For an example of what I did see my website http://www.origamiinteractive.com there are some pics of my longhorn crab beetle in the diagrams section > insects diagrams. This model was made using this exact method.
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Postby TheRealChris » September 3rd, 2005, 1:02 am

I'm really sorry, that I got that wrong :(
but maybe I'm foil-addicted :lol:
I tried to make those glue-tissue-paper-whatever once, but wasn't very satisfied with the result. maybe I should try it out once more.


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Postby T » September 3rd, 2005, 10:21 am

The hardest thing with the glue tissue paper stuff is that its very easy to make the tissue paper rip when it is wet wih the glue mix. ALso it creates a big mess. Make sure you use at least two sheets of tissue paper or else the paper will still be too fragile.
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Postby mastermattdude » September 3rd, 2005, 7:14 pm

Ok thanks a lot I think I can handle the mess and thanks especially for including the glue to water ratio , it would have taken me forever to find that one out.
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Postby T » September 4th, 2005, 11:22 am

A good tip if you're going to try this method:

IF the paper rips it means (usually) you are using too much glue in your mix.

Also you can alter the ratio to affect the outcome of paper a very high level of glue will make the paper stiffer and vice verser.

The hardest bit is turning the paper over without letting it stick (and rip ) on the surface below. Also letting it dry can be hard without the right stuff.

Good luck
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Postby wolf » September 8th, 2005, 2:41 am

If you don't mind sacrificing a part of the tissue paper, you can use a frame to hold the paper in place while applying the glue.

These can be made quite easily with a sheet of corrugated cardboard or styrofoam. Cut out the central portion and stretch the dry tissue over the the frame, using tacks to hold it at the edges. Apply the adhesive on both sides and let it dry, then cut out the paper from the frame. Eventually you'll have to throw away the frame when the paper remnants get too much to handle, at which point you can simply make another one. Or, make a sturdy frame from aluminium, which can then be scrubbed clean after use.
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Postby TheRealChris » September 8th, 2005, 1:37 pm

If you don't mind sacrificing a part of the tissue paper, you can use a frame to hold the paper in place while applying the glue.


what a great idea :) why didn't this idea came to my mind?
it has also the other advantage, that it can easily be stored to dry out. of course than there should be a couple of... hmm.... glueing frames to make more than one paper at once.
thanks :)

Cut out the central portion and stretch the dry tissue over the the frame, using tacks to hold it at the edges.


maybe you should keep the central point and put it back in place every time when you're going to make another sheet. the tissue can be roled onto the frame easier when the frame has no hole in the middle :) you could also put some glue onto the frame, put back the center tile and glue the tissue paper onto the frame by simply rolling it over.

"hello brain... hello creativity. nice to see you around... it has been a while" :D

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